Have you seen the recent commercial by Weight Watchers, dubbed My Butt? It’s a beauty. I admit, when I read about it in the USA Today article “Weight Watchers: Butts are in for 2015”, I was male-curious. Sorry, evolution gave my brain an instinctive admiration for the female derriere. But when you watch the ad and read about the strategy behind it, you realize there is much more than meets the eye behind the behinds.

The story of how Weight Watchers came about to run the ad featuring female butts through a woman’s life is instructive of how strategy changes take effect in real life. Weight Watchers was founded on the premise that people who want to diet will find a structured program both convenient and supportive and will therefore be less price-sensitive. That has been true for many years as WW became a successful giant. On the way it used celebrities as the face of diet. That marketing mindset comes naturally to consumer-oriented companies in this field. Nutrisystem did the same with Marie Osmond, and who among baby boomers doesn’t remember Jenny Craig’s Valerie Bertinelli with great fondness?

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YOU GOT AN OPINION ABOUT THAT?

A Broken Outsourcing Model,” by the Editorial Board of The New York Times. Suppliers in Bangla­desh compete to minimize cost at the risk to their workers lives. “A race to the bottom in the clothing industry needlessly puts lives at risk.”

Competing.com asks: How can we avoid races to the bottom? Should we avoid races to the bottom?

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I ate a healthful breakfast in a hotel lounge. Fresh fruit, plain Greek yogurt, and a single-serving box of raisin bran cereal.

The box practically promised me immortality. “100%* daily value of 11 vitamins & minerals,” it pledged. With each bite I could feel myself bursting with fitness and glowing with health. My shirtsleeves were tightening around my biceps.

Then I noticed the asterisk. “*Based on a 53g serving. This box contains 33g.” The box had 62% of the daily value of those 11 nutrients, and 38% baloney.

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