About the author  ⁄ Mark Chussil & Ben Gilad

Mark ChussilMARK CHUSSIL is founder & CEO of Advanced Competitive Strategies, Inc., and, with Benjamin Gilad, a cofounder and partner of Sync Strategy. He has conducted business war games, built custom strategy simulators, and taught workshops on strategic thinking for dozens of Fortune 500 companies on six continents, resulting in billions of dollars made or saved.

A pioneer in quantitative business war games and a highly rated speaker, he has 35 years of experience in competitive strategy. One of his simulation technologies has won a patent; a patent is pending on another. He has written three books, chapters for five others, and numerous articles.

He has been quoted in Fast Company, Harvard Management Update, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and elsewhere. He received the Fellows Award from the Strategic and Competitive Intelligence Professionals society in 2013. He earned his MBA at Harvard University and his BA at Yale University.


Dr Ben GiladBENJAMIN GILAD, PhD, is founder and president of the Academy of Com­petitive Intelligence, Inc., and with Mark Chussil, a cofounder and partner of Sync Strategy. He is a former associate professor of strategy at Rutgers University’s School of Management, and a pioneer in the field of competi­tive intelligence and war gaming. He has published seven books and more than 90 articles in academic and practitioners’ publications on the topics of behavioral economics, competitive intelligence, and business war gaming.

He has been running war games for Fortune 500 companies since the 1980s and teaching a course on war gaming as part of Fuld-Gilad-Herring Acad­emy of CI which grants CIP certification in the field of CI. The Strategic and Competitive Intelligence Professionals society awarded him its highest Meritorious Award in 1996.

He earned his PhD in economics at New York University, MBA at the University of Central Mis­souri, and BA at Tel Aviv University.

Behind every strategy there is competition for something: votes, power, profit, fame, etc.

Behind every strategy there is also a rationale, a reason why someone thinks it will work better than the alternatives.

People succeed (and fail) with wildly different strategies. But some strategies go further. They don’t make you think wow, that’s out of the box. They make you think yikes, you’re out of your mind.

Here is our end-of-year, politically incorrect review of absurd strategies. Remember: you don’t have to agree with us. We don’t even agree with each other, except maybe on a couple.

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Part One: The Attacks on Uber are Backfiring

By Ben Gilad

We are trained to think competition means offering customers better product or service than our rivals’. Based on this business-school perspective, we look for companies to use innovation, speed, service and other familiar factors to create competitive advantage.

How 2004 of us. In 2004, Elon Musk showed that using government and riding a favorite cause for the ruling party pays handsomely. (See Best Companies to Work For.) It is not that companies didn’t know that competition involves paying attention to regulators and lawmakers; it is that Elon Musk made it both an art form and a crucial element in his strategy. Without government subsidies, Tesla might have become a modern Tucker for all I know. (Never heard of a Tucker? That’s the point.)

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“The Sound of Competing” Episode 3: Culture Doesn’t Replace Strategy


Every corporation has a corporate culture. Is yours a competitive advantage?

Many pundits, especially those from the “soft” social sciences (psychology, sociology, anthropology), make a case that corporate culture is a critically important source of competitive advantage. They call for open and empowering cultures that they say uniquely encourage innovation and success. Yet, just as attitude can take you only so far in soccer if your stars are injured, culture can take you only so far within the competitive economics of the industry. Companies creaking with old-fashioned management styles have succeeded over decades. Startups wielding the most open, progressive, and innovative cultures have failed overnight.

The one aspect of culture which is critical is how information flows inside the organization. The reason: whether your management is an authoritarian, cigar-chomping Lord High Everything or an enlightened, organic Collective of Nice Dedicated Associates, without information you wear a blindfold during the big game.

In the podcast you’ll hear about the category of information that’s the most crucial to decision makers, why it is scarce, and what it takes to make it flow.

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“The Sound of Competing” is a new podcast from Competing.com. It’s conversations from Ben and Mark, plus the occasional reckless guest. It’s remarkable. It mixes serious concepts with humor. It’s edgy without sacrificing critical thinking. It’s the antidote to the silly and shallow. Also, there are titanic battles between good and evil. A ping pong match between two strategy giants resulting in commentary smart enough to listen to.

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“The Sound of Competing” Episode 2: Harmony Versus Confrontation

Facing reality is more important than being nice.

Aversion to confrontation is embedded in many national and corporate cultures. Unfortunately, that niceness feature can turn into a nasty bug when it enables bad strategy and bad management.

Coca-Cola recently decided to issue stock that will dilute ownership of existing stockholders in order to pay huge compensation to top management. How huge? $24 billion. Twenty-six states in the USA spend less than that each year. That seems excessive, to put it mildly, even if you assume Coca-Cola’s top executives are the most talented people in the world.

Warren Buffett, Coca-Cola’s largest stockholder, abstained when the Board voted even though he thought it excessive too. He didn’t want to create a rift with management. That’s the downside of nice. Too much harmony, too little confrontation, too bad for shareholders. Shareholders at other companies, too. “Well, Coca-Cola did it for their executives…”

Then there’s confronting reality. The culture of the large automobile companies in Detroit has long been notorious as good old boys who don’t rock the boat. Look at what happened to GM when it chose to keep product defects tightly under wrap rather than face the issue head-on. This year it will probably recall more cars in the USA than it will sell.

If you don’t create a safe forum to say, aloud and in time, that the king has no clothes, the rest of the world will do it for you, and not so nicely. It is not a mere business school cliché, as so many companies discover too late.

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“The Sound of Competing” is a new podcast from Competing.com. It’s conversations from Ben and Mark, plus the occasional reckless guest. It’s remarkable. It mixes serious concepts with humor. It’s edgy without sacrificing critical thinking. It’s the antidote to the silly and shallow. Also, there are titanic battles between good and evil. A ping pong match between two strategy giants resulting in commentary smart enough to listen to.

Subscribe by RSS feed

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“The Sound of Competing” Episode 1: Vision or Overconfidence?


Vision or Overconfidence?

Distinguishing between a vision (glory) and overconfidence (mirage) is important, critical, even imperative. Alas, it is also very tricky to do a priori; that is, before the fact. After the fact, we may be wiser. That’s one of the main arguments in Phil Rosenzweig’s new book, Left Brain, Right Stuff.

Rosenzweig makes valid points: no one thinks of him/herself as overconfident, and confidence, even in excess, may be the stuff that enables leaders to overcome resistance and skepticism. Still, we have encountered numerous occasions in which leaders, powerful executives, ignored early warning signs and crashed into mirages.

What does overconfidence look like? Or, perhaps, taste like. Coca-Cola is going all the way with its wonderful new toy, the Freestyle machine. These new and expensive dispensers are being deployed world-wide. The machines allow people to mix 146 possible flavors. They are incredibly fun and creative for those who crave designer sugar water. They raise vendors’ beverage sales as much as 6%.

And they will probably change nothing. Listen to the podcast to find out why, and which companies seem more likely to fall into the overconfidence trap.

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“The Sound of Competing” is a new podcast from Competing.com. It’s conversations from Ben and Mark, plus the occasional reckless guest. It’s remarkable. It mixes serious concepts with humor. It’s edgy without sacrificing critical thinking. It’s the antidote to the silly and shallow. Also, there are titanic battles between good and evil. A ping pong match between two strategy giants resulting in commentary smart enough to listen to.

Subscribe by RSS feed

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We are going to tell you two true stories of conflict between top management and product management. One involves a Fortune Global 200 pharmaceuticals company, the other a Fortune 500 consumer-product company. You may be surprised at the way the companies demonstrated skill at competing.

Conflict one: Triple sales!

We’ll start with the pharma giant. Their conflict was about sales goals.

Top man­agement wanted the business to triple sales of a recently launched product in a year. That was clearly a stretch goal but it was not unheard-of in the industry. Prod­uct managers did­n’t mind having a stretch goal, of course, but they wanted to be sure that the goal could be achieved in reality. That conflict is classic and both parties’ views are rational. Moreover, neither party is served by setting bad goals.

The company hired one of us, Mark, to help them quantify where stretch ended and fantasy be­gan for that product.

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