Welcome to Competing.com

Our Typical Reader

Our Typical Reader

This is a site about competing better. You could have guessed by the URL. The contributors will focus on examples of successful competing and unsuccessful competing.

Underlying competing is strategy. No one can compete better without strategy because strategy is what enables anyone to win. And luck. But the site about luck is www.lasvegas.com. We have little to say about that.

The brave reader who reached this page is inundated with data and news everywhere else. What we think we can do is give insight. Insight is a funny concept since everyone uses this word to mean “what I say is important and what others say is less so.” Indeed, we believe that too but we won’t say it like that.

Instead, here is our insight on insight: it is about perspective. It is based on the “facts,” but facts alone are never insight because data have no perspective. Only the interpreter can have a perspective.

We do not filter by whether the perspective is right or wrong (how would we judge anyway?). We only care that it is a perspective, and it is thoughtful, interesting, and doesn’t contradict itself. The reader can then do with it whatever the reader wants to do with it. Once in a blue moon we may be able to make a reader in Duluth, Minnesota sit up and say: “Hmmm… I didn’t think about it that way before.”

We live, or at least we write, for John in Duluth. John, thanks for your comment. And if you like this site, please tell your buddy Paul and your neighbor George and your uncle Ringo…

Contact us  or if you would like to write for us click here.

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Uber: Or, What’s Kosher in Competing?

Part One: The Attacks on Uber are Backfiring

By Ben Gilad

We are trained to think competition means offering customers better product or service than our rivals’. Based on this business-school perspective, we look for companies to use innovation, speed, service and other familiar factors to create competitive advantage.

How 2004 of us. In 2004, Elon Musk showed that using government and riding a favorite cause for the ruling party pays handsomely. (See Best Companies to Work For.) It is not that companies didn’t know that competition involves paying attention to regulators and lawmakers; it is that Elon Musk made it both an art form and a crucial element in his strategy. Without government subsidies, Tesla might have become a modern Tucker for all I know. (Never heard of a Tucker? That’s the point.)

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Camry Wins After Camry Loses

USA Today, MotorWeek, Cars.com, and an actual family tested and ranked family-sized, moderately priced sedans. The resulting article, originally published with the suspense-ruining headline “Winner is Hyundai Sonata Sport,” compared the Hyundai Sonata (who knew?), Chevrolet Malibu, Chrysler 200, Ford Fusion, Honda Accord, Mazda 6, Nissan Altima, Toyota Camry, and Volkswagen Passat.

I rate the results merely semi-interesting. The real story, though, is not about the cars. The real story is about the manufacturers and consumers. So here is what I learned from that riveting story investigating back-seat space and “giant grilles,” among other things of cosmic significance.

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Succeeding without Competing

The success most important to you may come not from comparing yourself to others but from doing what you want. Succeeding without competing is possible when we look inward. 

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Look at your life. What’s the sweetest success you have experienced?

Bring up the memory of that event or feat. Savor it. Think of what you did to achieve it; think of how you worked, struggled, and risked; think of how you felt when your goal was finally in your grasp. Re-experience your glory, pride, and joy. Let your heart swell and your face smile.

I had an experience like that a few weeks ago. It taught me a lesson about competing.

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Why Strategies Fail

No one adopts a strategy expecting it to fail, yet strategies fail. That doesn’t happen on purpose but it also doesn’t happen by accident.

Christele Canard, founder of Switched On Leadership, interviewed Competing.com co-founder Mark Chussil for the cover-story subject why strategies fail. You can read and download their wide-ranging discussion here.

Christele and Mark talk about:

  • Why smart strategists believe their strategy will work and what happens when they find out in business war games that it won’t.
  • What happened when Mark built a strategy decision test technology (patent pending) and his own strategies didn’t work so well. (Hint: first, he looked for a bug in the software. There was no bug.)
  • Why people are so comfortable thinking inside the box and what it takes to get them to go outside.
  • What’s wrong with “I did this and the result was that” reasoning.
  • How people can expand their strategic thinking with a simple question.
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Evidence of Strategy Everywhere: “Hot Doug’s”

You might think I’m announcing that today there is strategy in the United States. Such a discovery would indeed be welcome but it’s not what I mean. I mean that you can see strategy in almost every newspaper article. All you need is to want to see it!
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We tend to think strategy, in the sense of unique positioning, is for large companies with large strategic-planning staffs and large strategy-consulting firms presenting large bills. It might be that the opposite is true.

In large companies strategy is mostly tactical tweaks to the master plan that made them big to begin with. That strategy was the founder’s dream. It succeeded, and made the company large. The rest, as they say, is history, with a bit of tinkering at the margins.

The number of large firms that changed strategy or created strategy once they were big can be counted on one hand with perhaps four fingers left over. IBM (under Gerstner). (Apropos IBM, see also my co-editor Mark Chussil’s “The Holy Grail of Competing.”)

Did I say IBM?

Since small businesses are typically run by their founders, and since they haven’t yet accumulated the fat to sustain them for decades like large firms, if they are to survive they must have some unique positioning. If the business is local, we often don’t see “strategy,” but even a slight difference in activities can make, well, a big difference.

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